By Rachel Blevins / The Free Thought Project on The Daily Sheeple

The term “Spirit Cooking” made occult rituals mainstream for a brief period last year after WikiLeaks released a trove of emails from the account of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta. While a number of celebrities and media moguls were tied to occult practices at the time, recent revelations have added more media royalty to the list.

The name Ben Bradlee may sound familiar, as he was good friends with former President John F. Kennedy, and executive editor of the Washington Post from 1968 to 1991. Bradlee and his wife, Sally Quinn, were often in the spotlight, and after Kennedy was assassinated, they were even referred to as the “New Camelot.”

While Bradlee died in 2014, Quinn has since taken the time to give insight into the glamorous life lived by the media’s royal couple. However, some of the practices she describes are ones that would normally be written off as crazy conspiracy theories by outlets such as their beloved Washington Post.

However, WaPost actually praised it.

In her latest publication titled, “Finding Magic: A Spiritual Memoir,” Quinn reveals that she believes she has killed at least three people in her lifetime. She claims that while she did not harm anyone physically, she believes strongly in the occult, and has used hexes on people who got on her bad side.

According to a WaPo report on the contents of the memoir, Quinn began believing in spirits, magic and the occult as a child, and she said it stemmed from what she was taught by her mother and other maternal relatives. She claimed her mother used hexes on people who angered her immensely, such as a veterinarian who would not help their sick dog and an Army doctor who did not provide accurate care for Quinn. In both cases, Quinn wrote that her mother yelled, I hope you drop dead!” and within days, they did.

“Like mother, like daughter. In some of the most troubling passages of this book, she describes casting hexes on people who later died. One was an attractive young woman who flirted with one of Quinn’s earlier boyfriends. ‘I won’t say exactly what I did—even now I think that would be bad luck for me—but I practiced what I learned and observed. I worked on the hex for several days until I felt that it would have some effect.’ 

It did, she claims. The woman committed suicide. Quinn vowed never to cast a hex on someone else—a promise she did not keep. When New York magazine wrote an unfavorable profile of her, she ‘decided to put a hex’ on the magazine’s editor, Clay Felker. He later died of cancer.”

Quinn claimed that her third and latest hex was targeted at a psychic who gave her a “devastatingly brutal” reading regarding her son. “I vowed once again never to put another hex on anyone,” she wrote after the woman died of a cerebral hemorrhage. “Believe me, I haven’t, though I have to admit to being sorely tempted on occasion.”

She wrote that she “became more open to certain moments of transcendence” when she was 13 years old and she had a “spiritual experience” that she claims let her see her own future:

“I had the oddest sensation. As if I were watching flashbacks of my life, except I was seeing flash-forwards. My whole emotional future passed before me. ... It was a true psychic experience. From then on, everything that has happened to me has been something that, no matter how joyful or painful, I have somehow anticipated. Since then, I haven’t had an emotional experience that did not seem already familiar to me.”

The revelations in Quinn’s memoir are incredibly important because of the influence she and her husband had on the media and on the elite society for years. Whether or not the use of a “hex” was responsible for killing all of the victims Quinn mentioned, is irrelevant. The fact is that the practice is tied to the occult, and the idea—held by someone with such a massive level of societal influence—that the appropriate way to deal with someone who wrongs you is to sentence them to death, should raise some serious questions.

As The Free Thought Project has reported, there are other questionable Occult rituals that go beyond Podesta’s “Spirit Cooking.” In fact, one ritual where adults ingest the blood of the young in order to “increase longevity” is now an actual business in the United States that has attracted the attention of the elite.


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Since 2013, Christian news magazine The Olive Branch Report has featured the insightful writing and reporting of Greg Holt. His writing has been featured on American Prophet, American Clarion, Eagle Rising, Capitol Hill Outsider, Sons of Liberty Media, Rev. Austin Miles, and others. Greg is also the Publisher and Editor of Inspirational Christian Blogs.

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