Yesterday, in the post “Just How Profoundly Have We Been Lied To About WWII?,” FOTM‘s TrailDust asks whether all we’ve been told about WWII, specifically Hitler and the Nazis, is actually true.

For that, I applaud TrailDust’s courage, as I believe NOTHING should a priori be ruled beyond the realm of questioning.

This post is my nugget of contribution to TrailDust’s query.

 

A persistent popular misconception of Hitler and the Nazis is that they were Christians. Nothing can be further from the truth.

Instead, Hitler and the Nazis were animated by Nordic paganism and the occult.

The John Hay Library at Brown University contains a special collection — 81 of Hitler’s vast 16,000-volume library. The whereabouts of most of Hitler’s books is a mystery, although most scholars believe they’re scattered around Russia. We do know that 1,200 of them are in the Library of Congress in Washington, 81 in the John Hay Library. (Brown University)

Hitler marked the margins of his books with vertical lines beside paragraphs or sentences he thought important. According to Timothy Ryback, in his book, Hitler’s Private Library: The Books That Shaped His Life, one notable subject represented in the John Hay Library’s Hitler collection is the occult, including a book that Hitler had marked — Ernst Schertel’s Magic: History, Theory and Practice (1923). Ryback points to one marked sentence in Magic as quite chilling, given Hitler’s history:

“He who does not carry demonic seeds within him will never give birth to a new world.”

Some consider Hitler to be demonically possessed.

As an example, Jean-Michel Angebert asks in The Occult and the Third Reich: The Mystical Origins of Nazism and the Search For the Holy Grail (pp. 191 and 22):

“[N]umerous interpreters of the Nazi phenomenon have erred in insisting that the occultism and astrology of this period was merely a passing fancy, a whim of some mad-men . . . . By what sorcery could a man, starting with nothing, in the space of a mere ten years totally vanquish seemingly insurmountable obstacles blocking his ascent to power, and how could such a man capture the confidence of millions of people: the unemployed, the workers, the middle class, the intellectuals?”

Lewis A. Sumberg, in his “Translator’s Preface” to Angebert’s volume, pointedly asks (pp. xii and xiii):

“Was Hitler the devil? Objections of some ‘serious’ academicians notwithstanding . . . there is hard evidence showing not only that Hitler was possessed, but also that he possessed others . . . . The rise of occultism and the practice of the black arts by the myriad secret societies—particularly the kind represented by Satanism—was noted everywhere in the Germany of the 1920s.”

SIGNS OF HITLER’S DEMONIC POSSESSION

Italian Foreign Minister Count Galeazzo Ciano wrote in his diary: “I am certain that even if the Germans were given more than they ask for, they would attack just the same, because they are possessed by the demon of destruction.” (Galeazzo Ciano, The Ciano Diaries, p. 582.)

More recently, in an interview with Vatican Radio, the late Father Gabriel Amorth, Vatican’s chief exorcist, said:

“I am convinced that the Nazis were all possessed. All you have to do is think about what Hitler . . . did. Almost certainly they were possessed by the Devil. You can tell by their behaviour and their actions, from the horrors they committed and the atrocities that were committed on their orders.”

In fact, Vatican documents revealed that wartime pontiff Pope Pius XII had attempted a long-distance exorcism of Hitler. But the effort failed because, as Fr. Amorth explained, the possessed person must be consenting and willing and in the presence of the exorcist for the demon-banishing to succeed.

Those who had known Hitler thought he was demonically possessed.

Nazi Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels admitted he did not really know Hitler, although he worked with and saw the Führer almost every day. Goebbels told his aide-de-camp, Prince Schaumburg-Lippe, that there were times when Hitler gave him “the chills.”

The most striking testimony is that by Hermann Rauschning, a Nazi leader who later fled to the U.S.

In his 1939 book, Hitler Told Me, Rauschning described Hitler as controlled by “malefic influences of which he was no longer the master.” A chronic insomniac, Hitler’s sleeplessness became worse after 1934, his minimal sleep frequently interrupted by crying spells and night terrors. As recounted  by Rauschning, during one of his night terrors:

“Hitler was standing there in his bedroom, stumbling about, looking around him with a distraught look. He was muttering: ‘It’s him! It’s him! He’s here!’ His lips had turned blue. He was dripping with sweat. Suddenly, he uttered some numbers which made no sense, then some words, then bits of sentences. It was frightening. He used terms which were strung together in the strangest way and which were absolutely weird. Then, he again became silent, although his lips continued to move. He was given a massage and something to drink. Then, all of a sudden, he screamed: ‘There! Over there! In the corner! Who is it?’ He was jumping up and down, and he was howling. They reassured him that everything was all right, and he gradually calmed down.”

~Eowyn

Republished with permission Fellowship of the Minds


Viewpoints expressed herein are of the article’s author(s), or of the person(s) or organization(s) quoted or linked therein, and do not necessarily represent those of The Olive Branch Report

Subscribe to my daily newsletter, and join hundreds of daily readers and receive news and relevant commentary

Don't forget to follow The Olive Branch Report on Facebook and Twitter Please help spread the word about us, share our articles on your favorite social networks.

If you value what you see on The Olive, please consider donating, any amount helps. We derive NO revenue from this site, and upkeep is expensive.

donate to tobr

Print Friendly, PDF & Email