By J.D. Heyes

(National SentinelInvestigate Not Legislate: Well, that didn’t take long, not that we believed it would.

After gaining 34 seats in the House — 11 more than was needed to recapture the majority — Democrats are already talking about ways to flex their newfound muscle, to include multiple investigations into the White House and POTUS Donald Trump when the new Congress is seated in January.

There is even talk of impeachment, just as some Dems like Rep. Maxine Waters of California and Jerrold Nadler of New York openly discussed prior to the midterms.

Days before the election Nancy Pelosi even hinted that she planned to use congressional subpoena power as a weapon against the Trump administration.

“Subpoena power is interesting, to use it or not to use it,” Pelosi said at a conference in October, in reference to the authority of House committees to summon individuals and organizations to testify and/or provide documents under penalty of perjury. “It is a great arrow to have in your quiver in terms of negotiating on other subjects.” She added that she would use the power “strategically.”

Pelosi appeared to double down on her threat when she said after it became apparent Democrats would regain control of the House that the midterms were about “restoring the Constitution’s checks and balances to the Trump administration.”

“In sharp contrast to the GOP Congress, a Democratic Congress will be led with transparency and openness, so the public can see what’s happening and how it affects them. … We will have accountability,” Pelosi said.

She has also said that unearthing Trump’s personal tax returns would be “one of the first things we’d do” in an interview with The San Francisco Chronicle, calling it the “easiest thing in the world” to obtain them under statutory authority congressional committees have via the Internal Revenue Service code.

Like knowing what the president paid or did not pay in taxes is going to make American great again.

Of course, there are political risks that come with attacking POTUS Trump and even Republicans in general. Voters appeared to be saying they prefer divided government, but not crippled government. And while some Democrats flipped seats in state districts POTUS easily won, many of those candidates ran on local issues and appeared to voters as moderates.

That, and there is nothing about the Democratic Party that’s constitutional or transparent — as Barack Obama proved during his eight-year tenure and Democrats proved when they lied to pass Obamacare.

No doubt many of the Democrats’ crazed supporters are more interested in taking ‘revenge’ against the GOP and POTUS Trump in general. But at some point, we have to believe the majority of Americans will tire of the “gotcha!” circus and demand that their elected officials govern. 

Meanwhile, all was not lost on Tuesday. Republicans flipped three Democrat seats in the Senate — in Missouri, Indiana, and North Dakota (Rick Scott is leading incumbent Dem Sen. Bill Nelson in Florida) — giving them solid control over the chamber that will continue to confirm the president’s constitutionalist judges.

Campaigning is always easier than governing, as the Republicans discovered following the 2016 Democratic washout. If the Democrats waste their opportunity on pointless investigations or impeachment of an otherwise popular president, their majority isn’t going to last long.

Republished with permission The National Sentinel

 


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